Should You Kip? Part 2| Ep. 25

OK so you failed yesterdays test. In your head your thinking… this guy is a smuck. I can kip just fine and I can do a muscle up or two. What does he know?  I reflect…  “can” and “should” are totally different.  Anyone “can” cross the street… not everyone “should.”  Without proper preparation… looking both ways… crossing the street could be dangerous. Now “can” an improperly prepared person cross the street.  Sure, but with it comes risk. A good look both ways, your pretty safe.  A glance in one direction, you might get smacked.  Keeping your head buried in your cell phone and your asking for trouble.

Inherently we know the kip is easier. Our bodies do it naturally to compensate for arm weakness. Compensation is an evolutionary trait. It allows for us to complete a task when the task itself is the priority (An injured caveman limping away from a predator).  While compensation may work a few times its not the long term answer (limping caveman will eventually get eaten).

So how do we make the kip safer? This one is going to rock your world… We do strict pull-ups. Strict pulls ups allow us to build strength and eliminate the ballistic (fast=dangerous) part of the movement. Can’t do them you say, all good.  We have progressions. Watch the video and see.

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How bad did you fail?  Bottom line, the closer you are to zero the higher your risk, regardless your ability to kip.

Recon Ron

I love this capacity program. Takes about 5-8 mins to complete. Done daily before your normal workout. Consistency is key!!  Start at 2-3 reps below your max. The idea is never to hit failure but to hit fatigue.

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